Are You Hurting?This is a great post by Joseph Mattera.  Oftentimes MinisterSearch is brought in to fill an open position because a vacancy was created by someone, as Joseph puts it, who has become spiritually bankrupt.  The reality is this condition is not exclusive to worship pastors or pastors in general, it can happen to all of us – the best small group leader, the top salesman, the passionate little league coach.  How can we help each other?  I personally get this through my own experience.  What are your thoughts and experiences?  We would love to hear from you!  ~David Lyons, Founder MinisterSearch

TEN REASONS MANY CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN WORSHIP LEADERS ARE SPIRITUALLY BANKRUPT

The past several years there has been no shortage of prominent contemporary Christian leaders denouncing Christ either with their words or their actions. One time I ministered to a young man involved in the gospel music scene, and he confided in me that he almost lost his faith because of what he experienced when he went on tour with a band. (He said other gospel music performers regularly propositioned him!)

That being said, as a pastor and trans-local minister for more than three decades, I have come to the conclusion that many involved in Christian worship seem to have a very superficial relationship with the Lord and His Church. (I thank God we have had a strong process for ministry involvement in our local congregation. Hence, we usually have worship leaders with a solid walk with the Lord.)

Also, I write this in the context as one who was a professional musician who served on the worship team of our local church for more than twenty-five years.

The following are some of the reasons I believe why many worship performers are spiritually bankrupt:

(Based on my personal observation, not based on hard data)

1. Many are hirelings and not committed members to one church.

I have been shocked and dismayed to see how many large churches just hire out their worship team members, even if they are not committed Christians and/or committed to their local church. Consequently, when a gifted singer or musician first comes to Christ, they are sucked into a culture of play for pay and go where the dollars are rather than where the Lord is truly leading them.

2. Pastors do not enforce the same standards upon talented singers and musicians.

Many pastors turn the other way when it comes to the immoral or unethical behavior of their most talented musicians and singers. The reason for this is obvious, these performers help draw crowds into their congregation.

3. Often talented people get ahead without being deeply rooted in Christ.

Many people in this field find they get promoted, idolized and celebrated in their church merely because of their talent. Consequently, they have a superficial lifestyle and rarely see the need to die to self, seek God, and allow God to penetrate their soul.

4. Gifted Christian performers are idolized in the church.

We, evangelicals, have created a culture of entertainment that empowers and promotes the most gifted among us. These very gifted singers and performers are admired and celebrated for their abilities in a way that is not different from “The Voice” or “American Idol”. With all this adulation in the environment, it is no surprise that many Christian bands and performers are lifted up with pride and never mature in their faith.

5. The focus of worship is more about them than about Jesus.

The church usually puts talented singers and performers front and center during Sunday services. Hence, a service is largely judged by how good the band performed. This is the kind of setting that engenders man worship instead of Jesus worship. Worship leaders and performers often have big egos to match their talent and many erroneously (subconsciously) think that the service is all about them.

6. They often don’t sit under the Word after they perform.

I am amazed with how often I see many worship team members leave the service after they perform. I guess they think that the highlight of the service was their performance and everything else that ensues, including preaching, is a letdown.

7. They perform but do not worship from the heart.

When the pastor and congregation only care about the talent and effect of the worship experience, they perpetuate a culture of performance more than a culture of worship. Consequently, band members and singers will then focus more on performance than on worship. This result in band members programmed to equate worship more with performance than with drawing close to God.

8. They are overly sensitive and do not easily receive correction.

In my opinion, many in the music world are overly sensitive, ego driven megalomaniacs. (I know, because as a professional guitar player for many years, I was or am guilty of this!) Folks like this are very competitive and have a hard time admitting they are wrong. This does not make it easy for a pastor to bring correction to them since their identity is rooted more in their ability than in their God.

9. They do not study the word but rely upon performance sessions in church for their walk.

Many years ago I was shocked to realize that many of the worship leaders I got to know had no prayer life and rarely cracked open the Bible for personal study! Often, they depended upon worship practice and/or the Sunday services to try to connect with God. It alarmed me that many worship leaders were not themselves worshippers!

10. They do not have a spiritually mature worship person leading the team.

All of the previous points mentioned could be dealt with if the worship leader held them accountable. Of course, this will only happen if the worship leader is not a diva but a real disciple of Christ. Leaders set the culture of a team and if he or she is a spiritually immature “performer“, then most likely the whole team will be more about performance than worship.

In conclusion, I pray pastors and leaders will have the courage to sit down talented but prideful, worldly worship team members, so that Jesus will once again be the center of our worship.

This article was originally posted on Mattera Ministries International by Joseph Mattera.  February 4, 2015